ECCLESIASTICAL

We have a wide-ranging and long-standing track record in the area of Ecclesiastical work and in working with churches of various denominations.
One of the original partners of the firm, Chris Lelliott, developed a particular niche in this area and following his sad demise in 1994, we continued the work he had started and are to this day, still involved in a wide variety of church projects.

We have experience as Conservation Architects, working on Listing buildings of all Grades including those with Grade I listing.
We have seen many mixed development schemes with churches, which have enabled the construction of new church buildings following the disposal of parts of a site for commercial development.

Many of the projects have involved the improvement and extension of buildings, updating the style and range of accommodation offerred and very often, improving and redesigning the entrance areas of older buildings to create a more open and welcoming effect.

We continue to undertake Quinquennial conditions surveys for churches across the country and mainly in the South East of England. We have worked with Anglican churches in the London and Oxford Diocese, several Baptist churches, the Seventh Day Adventist Church organisation and also with many of the Methodist Circuits.

ECCLESIASTICAL

The Cornerstone Parish Centre in Wokingham

Parish securing their presence in the town centre

The scheme was for the Parish of All Saints in Wokingham.
The site for the new Parish Rooms building was to be in the churchyard of the Listed parish church building, positioned within the Wokingham Town Centre Conservation Area.
The Parish were thoroughly involved in the development of the detail of the design for the new building, which has now been named ‘The Cornerstone’.
The scheme was designed and built to a high standard of construction, appropriate to the setting.

The building provides three times the area of floor space originally available the original building it has replaced.
A large and sub-dividable Hall is the main focus at ground floor level with ancillary and office accommodation attached. On the first floor, there is a range of meeting rooms and office accommodation used by both the Parish and also a range of community-focussed groups and organisations.
The scheme won the Wokingham Major’s Design Award on completion.

The scheme was for the Parish of All Saints in Wokingham.
The site for the new Parish Rooms building was to be in the churchyard of the Listed parish church building, positioned within the Wokingham Town Centre Conservation Area.
The Parish were thoroughly involved in the development of the detail of the design for the new building, which has now been named ‘The Cornerstone’.
The scheme was designed and built to a high standard of construction, appropriate to the setting.

The building provides three times the area of floor space originally available the original building it has replaced.
A large and sub-dividable Hall is the main focus at ground floor level with ancillary and office accommodation attached. On the first floor, there is a range of meeting rooms and office accommodation used by both the Parish and also a range of community-focussed groups and organisations.
The scheme won the Wokingham Major’s Design Award on completion.

ECCLESIASTICAL

St James Church, Finchampstead

Reordering and refurbishment of a Grade I Listed Parish church

Very extensive works were completed at St James’ Church following a long period of careful planning by the Parish.
The building is a very attractive, Grade I Listed Parish church with great history.
The Parish have implemented a sensitive and thorough scheme, both to repair and discreetly update the building.
The historic structure was suffering from damp ingress, timber decay and other issues.
The floor was of solid construction and actually taken up and then remade in its entirety using limecrete.
A significant amount of wall plaster was removed and replaced inside the church, lime plaster replacing areas of problematic cement-based plastering.
The roof tiles were completely removed in stages, to allow repairs to be made to the roof timbers repaired before retiling with carefully selected matching clay tiles.

The internal finishes have all been made good in historically correct detail and the building refurnished with new joinery.
A new AV system has been discreetly introduced into the church.
The scheme was built by the Maidenhead contractors, Farr & Roberts Ltd.

ECCLESIASTICAL

St Matthew’s Church in Fulham

The first new London Anglican church in 2000, funded by site development

Originally on the site of St Matthew’s Church was the large Victorian Church building and an almost equally extensive Victorian Hall Building behind.
The buildings were no longer suitable for use by the Parish who faced mounting maintenance costs.
The scheme for St Matthew’s Parish is one of the longest running and also one of the most enjoyable projects I have been involved in, in recent years.
We investigated many different options with the Parish over years, and were able to source a developer willing to develop the site afresh, providing seven Affordable Houses to the rear. The land lease created sufficient funds to construct the new church building on the frontage.
The church building itself provides a good range of accommodation. A new Worship Area, Hall and Meeting rooms are all positioned around a central foyer area and accessed through the corner tower entrance, all on a single level.
Originally on the site of St Matthew’s Church was the large Victorian Church building and an almost equally extensive Victorian Hall Building behind.
The buildings were no longer suitable for use by the Parish who faced mounting maintenance costs.
The scheme for St Matthew’s Parish is one of the longest running and also one of the most enjoyable projects I have been involved in, in recent years.
We investigated many different options with the Parish over years, and were able to source a developer willing to develop the site afresh, providing seven Affordable Houses to the rear. The land lease created sufficient funds to construct the new church building on the frontage.
The church building itself provides a good range of accommodation. A new Worship Area, Hall and Meeting rooms are all positioned around a central foyer area and accessed through the corner tower entrance, all on a single level.
ECCLESIASTICAL

Christ Church in Thame

Resolving restricted access at the front of a historic church

Christ Church faces directly onto the market square in Thame and is a historic church building within the Conservation Area.
The building was originally entered only by a large set of central steps, and so there were the difficulties of restricted access.
Together, we reconfigured the front portion of the building inside and out. The main floor level inside the building front, was dropped to pavement level and a new, level-access entrance created by extending the building. Once inside, the change in floor levels can be negotiated by a new platform lift, or by a new and shallower stairway.

Immediately inside the entrance now, is a coffee shop.

ECCLESIASTICAL

Christchurch, Chineham

An Ecumenical Project in Basingstoke

The project is a large extension to the original hall building. The hall had been built in the 1980’s and took the shape of a quarter-pyramid, a distinctive form to be extended.
Our decision together was to create a new wing which would be connected to the existing hall and to create distinctive, single central entrance within a circular tower.
The project provided a new Worship Area, flexible meeting room spaces, ancillary accommodation and generous circulation and ‘spill-out’ areas to accommodate large numbers.
Importantly, the scheme was designed to be zero-rated for VAT, creating a significant saving for the client.
The construction was by Claude Fenton Construction, appointed following a competitive tender process.

The project is a large extension to the original hall building. The hall had been built in the 1980’s and took the shape of a quarter-pyramid, a distinctive form to be extended.
Our decision together was to create a new wing which would be connected to the existing hall and to create distinctive, single central entrance within a circular tower.
The project provided a new Worship Area, flexible meeting room spaces, ancillary accommodation and generous circulation and ‘spill-out’ areas to accommodate large numbers.
Importantly, the scheme was designed to be zero-rated for VAT, creating a significant saving for the client.
The construction was by Claude Fenton Construction, appointed following a competitive tender process.

ECCLESIASTICAL

St Mary’s Church, White Waltham

New Parish Rooms : The ‘Tree House’ Project

This small scheme for new Parish rooms on the edge of Maidenhead in the Parish of St Mary in White Waltham, is well-known locally.
Early in the development of the scheme, Planning Consent was eventually granted by The Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead. The new building is positioned in the churchyard of the Listed Parish Church, within the Greenbelt and in an area classified as ‘Countryside’ and so this was a unique Planning Consent to achieve.
The Parish have then raised significant funds for the construction over a period of several years of hard work and the scheme has now been built by the firm Adams & Wade in Maidenhead to a high standard, suited to the setting of the building.
The scheme was opened by Theresa May MP.
https://www.oxford.anglican.org/opening-the-tree-house-in-white-waltham/.

ECCLESIASTICAL

Christchurch, Dulwich

Opening up a prominent, but closed frontage

In its original design, the Victorian church in Dulwich once had a very closed appearance.
Frustrating, as the church has a vibrant life and offers a full range of activities across the week;
but these were only accessible through two pairs of solid oak doors which by necessity had to be kept closed most of the time. Also, the only access into the building was by two sets of steps.

Christ Church now, comprises a United Reformed Church, and a Methodist Church congregation combined.
The project we undertook involved a complete redesign of the frontage.
The whole of the lower front wall was removed, new structure inserted and the building extended out into a fully glazed frontage area which incorporates a new, glazed entranceway now accessible by a gradual ramp.

The completed scheme was opened by the interior designer, Linda Barker.

In its original design, the Victorian church in Dulwich once had a very closed appearance.
Frustrating, as the church has a vibrant life and offers a full range of activities across the week;
but these were only accessible through two pairs of solid oak doors which by necessity had to be kept closed most of the time. Also, the only access into the building was by two sets of steps.

Christ Church now, comprises a United Reformed Church, and a Methodist Church congregation combined.
The project we undertook involved a complete redesign of the frontage.
The whole of the lower front wall was removed, new structure inserted and the building extended out into a fully glazed frontage area which incorporates a new, glazed entranceway now accessible by a gradual ramp.

The completed scheme was opened by the interior designer, Linda Barker.

ECCLESIASTICAL

Eastney Central Hall

A new church building, funded by site development

The illustrations show the new Eastney Methodist Mission Centre, a scheme which was developed on the site of the original Methodist Central Hall in tandem with a scheme for residential development on t he same plot which largely funded the building of the new church.
The old Methodist Central Hall, typical of its type, was an extensive complex which had become too expensive to maintain. The church no longer had the need for the range of accommodation originally developed and the building had significant fabric issues.
The new church building is intended to be an attractive yet quite simple design with accommodation on two floor levels. This maximised the adjoining residential development to provide funds from the land lease, and the church building itself is efficient and economic in running costs.
In common with all of our church schemes, we designed the building in such a way as to reduce ongoing maintenance and repairs costs.